PORT OF BALBOA
The SOUTH end of the Panama Canal
Ships traveling from West to East have entered Panama Bay from the Pacific Ocean.
 They are actually traveling from South to North in the Canal Zone

Traveling North from here ships encounter the MIRAFLORES LOCKS.

BUT SOON!







The "BRIDGE OF THE AMERICAS"


RODMAN Naval Station



 Mexico Training Ship.


One of our submarines. Notice the Coast Guard Attack Boat riding with her.


A view looking South into Panama Bay


Waiting in Panama Bay to enter the canal.


SMALL oil tanker with a pilot tug.


Oil Tank Farm on Taboguilla Island


A Post-PANAMAX oil tanker like those positioned in Panama Bay. The "TI" refers to Tankers International.
They 1,243 ft long, 223 ft. wide, and have a depth of 112 ft.
Click image for source of info.


The maximum dimensions of ships that can pass through the Panama Canal are: 106 ft. in beam, 39 ft. draft in tropical fresh water, and 965 ft. long. Any ship that is the maximum size is called a "Panamax" ship. When you compare the width of the Panama Canal to the maximum ship's width, there's not much room on either side!

The Panama Canal is a waterway in Central America which joins the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. One of the largest and most difficult engineering projects ever undertaken, it had an enormous impact on shipping between the two oceans, replacing the long and treacherous route via the Drake Passage and Cape Horn at the southernmost tip of South America. A ship sailing from New York to San Francisco via the canal travels 6,000 miles, well under half the 14,000 mi route around Cape Horn. Although the concept of a canal near Panama dates back to the early 16th century.

 Each year more than 14,000 ships pass through the canal, carrying more than 205 million tons of cargo. By 2002 about 800,000 ships had used the canal altogether.The canal can accommodate vessels from small private yachts up to large commercial vessels. The maximum size of vessel that can use the canal is known as PANAMAX; an increasing number of modern ships exceed this limit, and are known as post-Panamax vessels. A typical passage through the canal by a cargo ship takes around nine hours. 14,011 vessels passed through in 2005, with a total capacity of 278.8 million tons, making an average of almost 40 vessels per day 
By MitTheMan

Here is another PANAMAX

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Go To GANTUN LOCKS  or   GATUN LAKE   or   CULEBRA CUT   or   PEDRO MIGUEL LOCKS.

Go To the PANAMA MAP    the     PACIFIC OCEAN MAP   or    the   ATLANTIC OCEAN MAP


NATIONAL OCEANIC and ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION VIEW POINT CELEBRATION LANDING RAMP MUSEUM